Seen my lady home las' night, Jump back, honey, jump back. Hel' huh han' an' sque'z it tight, Jump back, honey, jump back. Hyeahd huh sigh a little sigh, Seen a light gleam f'om huh eye, An' a smile go flittin' by-- Jum... Read more of A Negro Love Song at Martin Luther King.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy
    Home - Siouan Articles - Sioux Myths

Most Viewed

Somatology
The Siouan Mythology
The Mdewakantonwan
Alphabet
Tribal Nomenclature
The Sisitonwan Or Sisseton
The Oohe-nonpa Or Two Kettles
Designation And Mode Of Camping
The Siha-sapa Or Blackfeet
Phonetic And Graphic Arts


Least Viewed

Toiwe're
Winnebago
The Waqpe-kute
The Tutelo
The Quapaw Or Kwapa
The Ni-u'-t'a-tci Or Missouri
General Features Of Organization
3 _{~latin Small Letter Turned T~}{~latin Small Letter Open O~}iwe´re_ (_people Of This Place_)
The Osage
Organization


Random Siouan Articles

Winnebago
Dakota Social Customs
Somatology
The Catawba
Alphabet
The Siha-sapa Or Blackfeet
The Asiniboin
The Ihanktonwan Or Yankton
Dakota-asiniboin
The Sitcanxu



The Mdewakantonwan





The Mdewakantonwan were so called from their former habitat, Mdewakan, or
Mysterious lake, commonly called Spirit lake, one of the Mille Lacs in
Minnesota. The whole name means Mysterious Lake village, and the term was
used by De l'Isle as early as 1703. The Mdewakantonwan were the original
Santee, but the white people, following the usage of the Ihanktonwan,
Ihanktonwanna, and Titonwan, now extend that name to the Waqpekute,
Waqpetonwan, and Sisitonwan. The gentes of the Mdewakantonwan are as
follows:(2)

1. Kiyuksa, Breakers (of the law or custom); so called because members of
this gens disregarded the marriage law by taking wives within the gens.

2. Qe-mini-tcan (He-mini-can) or Qemnitca (Hemnica), literally,
Mountain-water-wood; so called from a hill covered with timber that
appears to rise out of the water. This was the gens of Red Wing, whose
village was a short distance from Lake Pepin, Minnesota.

3. Kap'oja (Kap{~COMBINING DOT BELOW~}oza), Not encumbered-with-much-baggage; Light Infantry.
Kaposia, or Little Crow's village, in Minnesota, in 1852.

4. Maxa-yute-cni (Maga-yute-'sni), Eats-no-geese.

5. Qeyata-otonwe (Heyata-otonwe), of-its-chief-Hake-wacte (Hake waste);
Qeyata-tonwan (Heyata-tonwan) of Reverend A.L. Riggs,
Village-back-from-the-river.

6. Oyate-citca (Oyate sica), Bad nation.

7. Tinta-otonwe (Tinta-otornwe), of Hake-wacte, or Tinta tonwan
(Tintatonwan) of A.L. Riggs, Village on-the-prairie (tinta).

These seven gentes still exist, or did exist as late as 1880.





Next: The Waqpe-kute

Previous: Designation And Mode Of Camping



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 6949